Category Archives: Food

rice noodle salad with quick tahini-lime dressing | brooklyn supper

Dressing
  • 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 cloves finely minced garlic (about 2 teaspoons)
  • 2 teaspoons finely minced chile (I used a Serrano here)
  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce, (I like Red Boat, for a vegan/vegetarian option, use liquid aminos)
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • 6 tablespoons water

To make dressing, combine lime juice, sugar, garlic, and chile in a small bowl. Whisk in fish sauce, tahini, and water. Taste and add more lime, sugar, or chile as needed. Sauce will keep well covered in the fridge for several days.

Source: rice noodle salad with quick tahini-lime dressing | brooklyn supper

Susan Jung’s recipe for sizzling sisig and garlic rice | Post Magazine | South China Morning Post

The recipe is a great way to introduce Filipino cuisine to those who haven’t tasted it

Source: Susan Jung’s recipe for sizzling sisig and garlic rice | Post Magazine | South China Morning Post

750 grams well-layered, skin-on pork belly

2 pig ears (about 350 grams in total)

Cooking oil, as needed

1 onion (about 220 grams), chopped

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

200 grams chicken livers, finely chopped

4-8 red bird’s-eye chillies (or more to taste), chopped

1 green banana chilli, cut into 5mm pieces

About 20ml fish sauce

About 20ml fresh calamansi juice

About 30ml vinegar (distilled white, rice or

coconut vinegar)

Fine sea salt and fresh ground black pepper

To serve:

Fresh calamansi limes, halved

1-2 3mm-thick slices of red onion, chopped

2 eggs (use only one if serving half the recipe)

Mayonnaise (optional)

Use a butane (or propane) torch to singe off the hairs on the pig ears and the skin of the pork belly. Rinse the ears and belly with water. Fill a large pot about three-quarters of the way with water, add about 10 grams of salt and bring to the boil. Add the belly and ears, bring to the boil, then lower the heat and simmer for about 90 minutes, or until the pieces are tender enough to be easily pierced with a paring knife. Remove the belly and ears from the water and as soon as they’re cool enough to handle, finely chop them.

Heat a wok or pan (preferably well-seasoned cast-iron or carbon steel) over a medium-high flame. If using cast-iron or carbon steel, rub oil very lightly into the interior; if using stainless steel, add about 20ml of cooking oil, or more as needed to prevent the pork from sticking. When the wok/pan is hot, add the chopped belly and ears and cook, stirring frequently. The fat will start to render out of the pieces, which will turn brown and crisp. Remove the solids from the pan, leaving behind as much fat as possible. If there’s more than about 30ml of fat, pour off some of it; if there’s less than 30ml of fat, add cooking oil to the pan. Heat it over a medium flame then add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring often, until the onion is soft. Add the pork back to the pan, season it lightly with salt and stir it until it starts to sizzle. Mix in the chicken liver, red and green chillies, fish sauce, calamansi juice, vinegar and some black pepper. Stir constantly until the chicken liver is cooked, then taste for seasoning and adjust as needed. Scoop the sisig onto a hot, lightly oiled sizzler platter (or a plate) then scatter the red onion pieces on top. Make two craters in the sisig then crack two eggs and put one into each indentation. Drizzle with mayonnaise (if using) and add several fresh calamansi pieces. Squeeze the juice from the calamansi, then mix in the egg and mayonnaise.

Garlic rice

600 grams cooked long-grain rice, chilled

10 garlic cloves, chopped

About 45ml cooking oil (or lard)

Fine sea salt

Use dampened hands to break up any lumps of rice. Put 45ml of oil (or lard) in a wok, add the garlic and heat over a low flame until the garlic is medium golden. Watch it carefully and stir frequently so it doesn’t burn. Use a slotted skimmer to scoop the garlic from the pan, leaving behind the fat. Heat the wok over a medium-high flame, add the rice, season with salt and mix in about three-quarters of the fried garlic. Stir-fry until the rice is hot, adding more oil or lard if needed to prevent it from sticking to the pan. Scoop the rice into a serving bowl and scatter the reserved garlic on top.

Brooklyn Bialy Recipe Bialystok Kucken) Recipe – Genius Kitchen

This was a recipe that originated in Bailystok Poland and brought to New York by Eastern European Immigrants.These were once well known in New York delicatessens ( mainly in Manhattan’s Lower East Side) and a favorite of the Jewish community. It’s not really known outside of New York because of its short self life which does not lend itself being shipped all over the country.These are similar to a bagel but there is no hole in the middle just a depression which is filled with onion, garlic or poppy seeds. It can be likened to the onion pletzel. Can also be made in different sizes from 3-4 inches to the size of a small pizza.

Source: Brooklyn Bialy Recipe Bialystok Kucken) Recipe – Genius Kitchen

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Cover two baking sheets with parchment paper and sprinkle lightly with cornmeal. Prepare Onion Topping:.
  2. In a small bowl, combine vegetable or olive oil, poppy seeds, onions, and salt; set aside, set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, combine 1/2 cup water, yeast, and sugar; let stand 10 minutes or until foamy.
  4. Add remaining 1 1/2 cups water, salt, bread flour, and all-purpose flour.
  5. Knead by hand or with dough hook of mixer for 8 minutes until smooth (the dough will be soft).
  6. Add flour if you think the dough is too moist , a tablespoon at a time.
  7. If the dough is looking dry, add warm water, a tablespoons at a time.
  8. Form dough into a ball and place in a lightly oiled bowl, turning to oil all sides. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise 1 1/2 hours or until tripled in bulk. Punch dough down in bowl, turn it over, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise another 45 minutes or until doubled in bulk.
  9. On a floured board or counter, punch dough down and roll into a log.
  10. With a sharp knife, cut log into 8 rounds. Lay dough rounds flat on a lightly floured board, cover with a towel, and let them rest 10 minutes.
  11. Gently pat each dough round into circles (a little higher in the middle than at the edge), each about 3 to 4 inches in diameter. Place bialys on prepared baking sheets, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise an additional 30 minutes or until increased by about half in bulk (don’t let them over-rise).
  12. Make an indention in the center of each bialy with two fingers of each hand, pressing from the center outward, leaving a 1-inch rim.
  13. Place approximately 1 teaspoon of Onion Topping in the hole of each bialy.
  14. Dust lightly with flour, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise 15 minutes.
  15. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  16. Bake on upper and lower shelves of the oven for 6 to 7 minutes, then switch pans and reverse positions of pans (front to back), and bake another 5 to 6 minutes until bialys are lightly browned.
  17. NOTE: These are soft rolls, and it is important not to bake them too long or they will be very dry.
  18. Remove from oven and let cool on wire racks.
  19. After cooling, immediately place in a plastic bag (this will allow the exterior to soften slightly).
  20. NOTE: These rolls are best eaten fresh, preferably lightly toasted and smeared with cream cheese. For longer storage, keep in the freezer.
  21. Makes 8 bialys.

Onion and Poppy Seed Bialys Recipe | SAVEUR

Source: Onion and Poppy Seed Bialys Recipe | SAVEUR

makes About 1 1/2 Dozen

Ingredients

1 tbsp. barley malt syrup (available from iherb.com)
1 (14-oz.) package active dry yeast
5 cups bread flour
2 tsp. kosher salt, plus more to taste
2 tbsp. canola oil
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 small yellow onions, finely chopped
1 tbsp. poppy seeds
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

Make the dough: In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a hook, stir together syrup, yeast, and 1 ½ cups water heated to 115°; let sit until foamy, about 10 minutes. Add flour and salt, and mix on low speed until dough forms; increase speed to medium, and knead dough until smooth, about 8 minutes. Cover bowl with plastic wrap, and let sit until doubled in size, about 1 ½ hours.
Meanwhile, make the filling: Heat oil in a 12″ skillet over medium-high heat; add garlic and onions, and cook, stirring occasionally, until deeply caramelized, about 30 minutes. Remove from heat, and stir in poppy seeds and salt and pepper; set aside to cool.
Uncover and punch down dough; cover again and let sit until doubled in size again, about 1 hour. Uncover dough and transfer to a clean work surface; portion and shape into about eighteen 2-oz. balls. Place 6 balls each on 3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets, spaced evenly apart; cover with plastic wrap and let sit until puffed, about 30 minutes. Uncover balls, and using the palm of your hand, gently flatten each into a disk; cover again and let sit until puffed, about 30 minutes.
Heat oven to 450°. Uncover balls, and, using your fingers, press the center of each to indent; continue pressing and stretching center of each dough ball until you’re left with a thin center membrane surrounded by a thick ring of dough on the outer edge. Fill centers of each dough round with about 1 tsp. onion-poppy seed filling. Working with one baking sheet at a time, place in oven, and spray bialys with water until completely coated. Bake until lightly browned and still soft, about 16 minutes.
 

ECLADE DE MOULES 2013 – YouTube

Cooking mussels by covering them in a big pile of pine needles and setting it on fire.  Cool method!  Supposed to “adds to their brininess the fragrance of the forest floor”.

I dunno.  Not a fan of pine flavor.  Or forest floors.  And am a big fan of the juice from mussels, which is totally lost.  But it’s cool anyway.

BTW: they never show them actually picking them up and eating them. That part will remain a mystery

Your ‘Craft’ Rye Whiskey Is Probably From a Factory Distillery in Indiana

The artisan whiskey industry has a big secret—many of the ‘small-batch’ distillers are actually buying their product from a large factory in Indiana.

Read the promotional materials for the Rancho de Los Luceros Destilaría and you form an image of a supremely artisanal effort. The distillery creates “small batch heirloom spirits handcrafted in New Mexico.” Each batch of their rye whiskies, vodka, and gin is “individual and unique,” and “each bottle is hand bottled and hand marked with batch and bottle number.”

These are the standard selling points of the craft-distilling movement, with its locavore lingo, terroir talk, and handmade hype. But, in the new crowd of micro-distillers, it is now standard for the alcohol being sold to come not from their own distinctive stills, but from a hulking factory in Indiana.

Lawrenceburg, Indiana (not to be confused with bourbon-locale Lawrenceburg, Kentucky) is home to a massive brick complex that cranks out mega-industrial quantities of beverage-grade alcohol. The factory, once a Seagram distillery, has changed hands over the decades and was most recently acquired by food-ingredient corporation MGP. It is now a one-stop shop for marketers who want to bottle their own brands of spirits without having to distill the product themselves. MGP sells them bulk vodka and gin, as well as a large selection of whiskies, including bourbons of varying recipes, wheat whiskey, corn whiskey, and rye. (They also make “food grade industrial alcohol” used in everything from solvents and antiseptics to fungicides.) Their products are well-made, but hardly what one thinks of as artisanal. And yet, much of the whiskey now being sold as the hand-crafted product of micro-distilleries actually comes from this one Indiana factory.

Upstart spirits companies selling juice they didn’t distill rarely advertise the fact. But there are ways to tell: whiskey aged longer than a distillery has been in business is one of the telltale signs that the “distiller” is actually just bottling someone else’s product. KGB Spirits, the company behind the New Mexico “destilaría,” was founded in 2009; but its flagship Ceran St. Vrain straight rye whiskey comes with an age statement of 15 years in the barrel. Or take Breaker bourbon, the “first bourbon produced in Southern California since Prohibition.” The Buellton, California company behind the brand, Ascendant Spirits, wasn’t started until 2013. Yet, they brag their “ultra small batch bourbon” is aged 5 years. So how do you open a distillery one year and have 5- or 15-year-old whiskey to sell the next? Not by making it.

“I have purchased hundreds of barrels of rye and bourbon from them,” John Bernasconi admits when asked about the Indiana factory. A principal in the New Mexico company, Bernasconi says that purchasing whiskey from MGP and bottling it is “a means to develop a brand and help fund the next step” of actually distilling a unique product. It may be a sensible enough business strategy, but as whiskey writer Charles Cowdery points out, “There’s no reason to think anyone knows how to make whiskey or can learn how to make whiskey based on buying whiskey.” Cowdery has been railing for years against the proliferation of what he calls “Potemkin distilleries,” many of which own shiny new copper stills to wow visitors, but actually sell factory-made spirits they’ve acquired in bulk.

High West hopes to make the transition, at least in part. The Park City, Utah distillery has been celebrated for its well-aged rye whiskies and its bourbon-and-rye blends, all of which come from the Indiana factory, as owner David Perkins readily acknowledges. High West makes some un-aged spirits and they are currently aging some whiskey of their own, but they have no plans to stop using the whiskies available from Lawrenceburg. “Since MGP whiskey is [more than] 80 percent of my revenues, it might be silly to wean myself off of that,” Perkins says. “I don’t think my employees would like the pay cut!”

Part of the problem is the competition. MGP has plenty of aged whiskey ready to go in the bottle right now. An upstart distiller has to buy a still and learn how to use it; then buy all the ingredients and actually ferment and distill them; buy barrels and build or lease warehouses in which to put them; and then sit on the investment for years. Todd Leopold, master distiller at Denver’s Leopold Bros., has managed to do it. But how much easier, he says with disdain, for those who just buy whiskey off the shelf and market it. “All that they do is hire salespeople, make up a BS story, and boom, they look like a distillery,” Leopold says.

Dozens of new brands are packaging whiskey bought in bulk from Indiana. But it isn’t the only source. Some recently launched whiskey brands, such as the much-hyped WhistlePig Rye (which touts the product as “hand-bottled” on a Vermont farm), get their product from a factory distillery in Canada. Others are picking up cast-off barrels from high-volume Kentucky “macro-distillers” who occasionally find themselves with more whiskey than they can sell under their own labels. But Cowdery warns that the newbie “distiller” shouldn’t count on finding brilliant whiskies in the barrels being shed by the big brands: “They’re not getting rid of their best stuff.”

The Indiana distillery, by contrast, does sell its best stuff, because MGP Ingredients doesn’t have any brands of its own. Originally, the rye that was made there had a particular purpose—as a component to “flavoring whiskey” in the Seagram’s Seven Crown blend. But it turns out that the rye in MGP’s warehouses, when not used for blending, is very good whiskey all on its own—one more reason why the industrial product is behind so much of the “craft” rye revolution.

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